Tag Archives: gender

“Identity Entrepreneurs” Selected for Yale/Stanford/Harvard Junior Faculty Forum

I am pleased to share that my article “Identity Entrepreneurs,” which is forthcoming in the California Law Review later this year, was selected for presentation the Yale/Stanford/Harvard Junior Faculty Forum. This year the Forum will take place in at Yale Law School on June 26-27. I’m excited to attend and to share my work with top scholars in my field, as well as to meet the other junior scholars whose papers were selected. You can find more information about the Forum here.

“Identity Entrepreneurs” Reviewed on JOTWELL

Ruthann Robson (CUNY) has a generous and very helpful review of my article “Identity Entrepreneurs,” forthcoming in the California Law Review, out in JOTWELL today. I appreciate the feedback and invite comments from others.

“Identity Entrepreneurs”: New Article Forthcoming in California Law Review

My latest article, “Identity Entrepreneurs,” is forthcoming in the California Law Review. I’m thrilled to be working with a journal that has published so many of the seminal works relating to identity and discrimination. The abstract to the piece is available after the jump: Continue reading

The RightsCast, Episode 5: Jessica Clarke, Inferring Desire in Sexual Harassment Cases

I meant to post this to the blog earlier and it slipped my mind — this week’s episode of The RightsCast features Professor Jessica Clarke of the University of Minnesota Law School and can be viewed below. It’s a fascinating comparison of sexual harassment cases in which the harasser and target are the same sex, and cases in which they are opposite sexes. Enjoy!

The RightsCast, Episode 4: Khaled Beydoun, Legal Construction of Arab American Identity

I really learned a lot from recording and editing this week’s episode of The RightsCast. I interview Professor Khaled Beydoun (Barry) about the way the legal system — both historically and today — constructs Arab American identity. In particular, we talk about the conflation of “Arab American” and “Muslim American” — a highly misleading conflation given that about two thirds of Arab Americans are Christian. Continue reading

New Piece on Slate: “Domestic Violence Is Violence”

I have a new article today on Slate about the way we tend to overlook or downplay gendered violence. I was prompted to write the piece after a tweet I wrote of the cuff ended up getting retweeted a lot, and seemed to resonate with people. I observed that Ismaaiyl Brinsley (and other men who shoot their girlfriends) don’t make the news unless they do something else (here, the tragic shootings of New York police officers Wenjian Liu and Rafael Ramos). My point was simply that it’s an awful thing that domestic violence is so common that ti’s not even newsworthy. After seeing the kind of response the tweet prompted, I thought I’d elaborate.

Selected to the 2014 ABA Blawg 100

I’m pleased to announce that this blog — which is still less than a year old — has been selected to the ABA Blawg 100. The 100 selected blogs are now competing against one another in 13 categories. Mine is in the “Prof” division. If you’re so inclined, please check out the full list of 100 blogs and consider voting for me.

If you’re new to this blog and made your way here from the ABA Journal site, here are a few posts from the past year that, I think, collectively capture what my blog is about:

Some Reading Recommendations on Gamergate and Online Abuse

One silver lining to the increased attention that Gamergate has received is that a lot of worthwhile pieces have been written about online abuse, particularly as it targets women and other marginalized groups. I learned a lot from this piece by Amanda Hess detailing a conversation with an FBI agent about why it’s so hard to prosecute people who make threats and otherwise use the Internet illegally. Particularly striking to me was the FBI agent’s comment about the volume of work:

“It was never a matter of not caring . . . the volume of work coming in every day was absolutely staggering. We had to do triage, almost as if we were in a war zone, deciding which patients to treat first.”

Continue reading

Danielle Citron: “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace”

I recently finished reading “Hate Crimes in Cyberspace,” an important new book by Danielle Keats Citron. I hope to write up some thoughts here in the coming weeks. For now, I simply want to recommend that everyone read the book. It’s compelling, thoughtful, and timely. And in the meantime, the Guardian has an excellent review by Katharine Quarmby. Here’s an excerpt:

In Sartre’s play his three unhappy characters are trapped, without an exit. But we have one. The law, Citron writes, has what she calls an “expressive value” – it helps us distinguish between right and wrong, and it can result in offenders being put behind bars. Site operators can remove the anonymity of trolls and delete abusive speech. But the heavy lifting comes down to us, trapped in the virtual room with one another.